GC

Le Dû's Grand Crew October '19: "Oregon"

Posted by Connor Smith on

Le Dû's Grand Crew October '19: "Oregon"

Though once believed to be too cold for vines, Oregon has become a Garden of Eden for winemakers from around the world making a multitude of styles. It all began in the mid-60s when pioneers David Lett and Charles Coury struck out to the north, defying the accepted wisdom of their UC Davis professors. The Pinot Noirs produced over the next two decades in the lush Willamette Valley progressively caught more and more eyes - and palates. In the late 80s, the Burgundy negociant Maison Drouhin was so convinced of Oregon's potential that they began buying up land up and down...

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Le Dû's Grand Crew September '19: "Western Mediterranean Islands"

Posted by Connor Smith on

Le Dû's Grand Crew September '19: "Western Mediterranean Islands"

There is an extraordinary wine country hiding in plain sight in Europe. Corsica, Sardinia, and the Balearics each fly different flags over their government buildings, but are inextricably linked in culture and history across the millenia. Though their wines show characteristics of their respective suzerains, there are unmistakable qualities that unite them: energy, freshness, and the saline bite that can only come from seaside vineyards. The grape names here like Cannonau, Malvoisie, and Nieullicio may seem strange, but they may blossom into approachability when you learn that these are merely local names for Grenache, Vermentino, and Sangiovese respectively. But ,...

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Le Dû's Grand Crew August '19: "Austria"

Posted by Connor Smith on

Le Dû's Grand Crew August '19: "Austria"

Much like the history of Austria itself, Austrian wine often gets overlooked in the popular imagination compared to the central role it has always played. Going back centuries, Austrian nurseries have been a source for high-quality material of hundreds of grape varieties. In addition to the French varieties that were imported to Vienna and disseminated throughout Central Europe, the noble varieties indigenous to the lands of the Habsburg Empire, such as Blaufrankisch, Sankt Laurent, and Gruner Veltliner, were catalogued and preserved. A large proportion of the top-quality vine material in the US can trace its genetic lineage to Vienna. Winemaking...

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Le Du's Grand Crew July '19: "Santa Barbara County"

Posted by Connor Smith on

Le Du's Grand Crew July '19: "Santa Barbara County"

Since the re-emergence of American fine wine in the 60s and 70s, Northern California has accrued the lion's share of critical and commercial success. But while categories like Oregon wine, Washington wine, and New York wine have carved out roles for themselves as contrasts to a monolithic "California wine", the most serious challenger may come from within the state. An array of wine regions have developed along the maritime-influenced Central Coast, often emphasizing a softer touch than the pomp of Napa and Sonoma. Santa Barbara County is the most southerly, but also the closest to the cold influence of the...

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Le Dû's Grand Crew June '19: "The Lower Loire"

Posted by Connor Smith on

Le Dû's Grand Crew June '19: "The Lower Loire"

Looking for a Santa Barbara wine? The link on the tags for our July wines didn't have their URL updated. You can find their videos by clicking here for leduwines.com/blogs/gc/july19! The soggy, stony corner of France known as the Lower Loire has more in common on a climatic level with the British Isles than it does the sunny, easy vineyards of the east and south that you might picture when you think of French wine. But despite this - or, perhaps, because of it - this may be the wine region with the purest farming practices in the world. Winemaking here...

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